Outdoor Cooking Fire Safety

Every year Americans look forward to summer vacations, camping, family reunions, and picnics. Summertime, however, also brings fires and injuries due to outdoor cooking. Annually, just under 5,000 Americans are injured by charcoal/wood-burning and propane grill fires. (Source: Consumer Product Safety Commission)

Summertime should be a time of fun and making happy memories. Knowing a few fire safety tips and following safety instructions will help everyone have a safe summer.

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The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) found that gas and charcoal grills are responsible for 3,400

structure fires in or on home properties, resulting in a combined direct property loss of $137 million. Gas-fueled grills caused an estimated 2,800 home structure fires and 4,400 home outdoor fires in 2005. Charcoal and other solid-fueled grills caused an estimated 600 home structure fires and 500 outdoor fires.

 

Barbecue Safety Tips

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills must only be used outdoors. If used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces such as tents, they pose both a fire hazard and the risk of exposing occupants to toxic gases and potential asphyxiation.
  • Position the grill well away from siding, deck railing, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas, and foot traffic.
  • Keep children and pets from the grill area: declare a three-foot "safe zone" around the grill.
  • Put out several long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames when cooking.
  • Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.

 

Fire Pits

In recent years, there has been a new concern for the Fire

Service - fire pits. Fire pits are known to be a great source of warmth and ambience. But, with the popularity of fire pits increasing, fire safety has become even more important. There are many things you should consider while setting up and using a fire pit.

  • Keep away from flammable material and fluids such as gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, and charcoal lighter fluid or vehicles while in use.
  • Do not use flammable fluids such as gasoline, alcohol, diesel fuel, kerosene, and charcoal lighter fluid to light or relight fires.
  • Exercise the same precautions you would with an open fire.
  • Do not allow children to use the fire pit. Keep children and pets away.
  • Do not wear flammable or loose fitting clothing such as nylon.
  • Do not burn trash, leaves, paper, cardboard, or plywood. Avoid using soft wood such as pine or cedar that likely pop and throw sparks. Use of seasoned hardwood is suggested.
  • Before starting the fire, make sure that the lid will still close to extinguish the fire in case of emergency. Do not overload.
  • Before you light the fire, check the wind direction.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher or garden hose nearby.

 

For more information check out the links below:

 
Official website of the City of Saint Albans, Vermont | (802) 524-1500 |